Brain Pill Review: Is It One of the Best Brain Supplements?

Perhaps you’ve noticed that your cognitive abilities aren’t what they used to be. Maybe you’re moving up in the world and need to boost mental performance to keep up with your new professional demands. 

In any case, we want the best for our brain health, but the endless range of supplements that claim to improve cognitive function can feel confusing. Let’s take an in-depth look in this Brain Pill review, a supplement featuring 13 natural ingredients and claims an impressive set of benefits.

Brain Pill: First Look 

What We like 

  • 13 nootropic ingredients with a range of effects on mental performance.
  • Key B vitamins and DHA for optimal brain nutrition.
  • Ginkgo and vinpocetine for improving blood circulation.
  • Dopamine-boosting tyrosine and Bacopa to combat mental fatigue and brain fog.
  • Phosphatidylserine to support brain cell regeneration, preventing cognitive decline.
  • Relaxing L-theanine to manage stress.

What We Don't Like 

  • The official website lists scientific evidence that includes a study specifically on Brain Pill, but no links are provided for verification. 
  • Titanium dioxide is included as a filler, which has mixed evidence of safety.
  • Dosages of ingredients are unavailable on the website but can be found on the product packaging.

Deals Available

  • Purchasing a larger volume of supplements lowers the price per pack, with the six-month package costing around $10 less each month than one bottle alone and including free shipping. Buying directly from the website also gives you a lower price. 

Bottom Line

Brain Pill appears to be an effective way to support cognitive function but has questionable ingredient transparency and fillers. Check out Brain Pill here if you’re interested in purchasing your first bottle. 

What Is Brain Pill?

Brain Pill is a nootropic supplement containing 13 brain-boosting ingredients. Nootropics are foods, dietary supplements, and herbal medicines that may enhance cognition through a number of mechanisms, including increased neurotransmitter production. 

Who Manufactures Brain Pill?

The Canadian company Leading Edge Health manufactures Brain Pill. Leading Edge Health has over 20 years of experience in manufacturing supplements and skincare products, with the Skinception line and GenF20 Plus listed on the Brain Pill website as examples. 

How Do Nootropics Like Brain Pill Work? 

Nootropics like Brain Pill have several possible mechanisms behind their ability to boost cognition. They include enhancing neurotransmitter production, increasing the rate of brain cell regeneration, boosting blood flow to the brain, providing antioxidant support, and regulating brain waves. Brain Pill mainly focuses on ingredients that increase neurotransmitter levels. 

Benefits of Brain Pill Nootropic Supplement

The Brain Pill nootropic supplement claims to have several benefits that can improve your cognitive abilities and overall brain health:

  • Improved Cognitive Speed: How fast we can think and react is essential to many everyday tasks and professions. The ingredient citicoline has been shown to improve psychomotor and cognitive speed in healthy volunteers. Visual searching test scores improved from almost 87 to 104.9 in the supplemented group, almost six points more than the placebo [1]
  • Greater Mental Endurance: When we’ve just had to keep going and going, it’s easy to get stressed out and want to throw in the towel. L-theanine not only boosts brain performance but promotes relaxation and a positive mental attitude as a result. It increases alpha-brainwave activity, which keeps us calm but alert [2]
  • Improved Memory: Huperzine A is described as an ingredient no memory-enhancing nootropic can go without. A trial involving students found improved test scores after supplementation compared to the placebo, with a Memory Quotient average of 115 compared to 104 [3]
  • Greater Focus and Concentration: Dopamine stimulation enhances mental health by supporting motivation and the ability to focus. Bacopa monnieri is one ingredient that increases dopamine production, including in the long-term by protecting dopaminergic brain cells [4]
  • Defense Against Cognitive Decline and Brain Fog: Better blood circulation can help to protect your brain cells long-term while keeping your mind sharp. Vinpocetine not only does this but also stimulates cellular energy production and has cell-protective abilities such as the regulation of mineral balance [5]

Brain Pill Side Effects

Unfortunately, a product containing all-natural ingredients doesn’t necessarily mean it is safe for you. Certain prescription drugs and medical conditions can make this and other nootropics off-limits. 

Interactions

Some of the ingredients in Brain Pill work by increasing neurotransmitter production. As a number of prescription and “smart” drugs, such as Adderall, racetams, Noopept, and antidepressants, have similar effects, use caution if you take them. 

Do not start Brain Pill or any other cognitive enhancer without medical supervision, and they are often best reserved as methods of quitting or reducing your dose of prescription medication. 

Contraindications

Tyrosine, one of the ingredients aimed at raising dopamine levels, may have adverse effects in people with schizophrenia as the disorder features high levels of the neurotransmitter. High doses of the amino acid may increase involuntary eye movement, and it is unknown whether this is made worse by other nootropic ingredients that also increase dopamine and additional neurotransmitters [6].

In other cases, even a natural substance may be completely unsafe. If you have a bleeding disorder or are on blood thinners, it is best to avoid supplements containing Ginkgo biloba entirely. Cases of hemorrhage and hematoma have been documented in people taking ginkgo who do not clot effectively [7]

Brain Pill Ingredients

Brain Pill contains 13 nootropic ingredients, each with its own set of benefits for brain function: 

  • Citicoline (as Cognizin).
  • Tyrosine.
  • Phosphatidylserine.
  • L-theanine.
  • Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) complex.
  • Vitamin B12.
  • Vitamin B9 (folic acid).
  • Vitamin B6.
  • Vitamin B5 (pantothenic acid).
  • Bacopa monnieri.
  • Ginkgo biloba.
  • Huperzine A.
  • Vinpocetine.

Citicoline

Citicoline is a version of choline safe to use in supplements. As described above, it can improve cognitive abilities such as psychomotor speed. 

Research looking at how citicoline works reveals that it raises levels of dopamine in neurons and increases the amount of noradrenaline and acetylcholine in the brain to boost memory and motivation. It also rescues nerve fibers from degeneration and improves nerve conduction, ramping up brain function as a result [8].

brain pill review Effectiveness of citicoline at improving composite memory

The group taking citicoline saw a greater improvement in composite memory than the place group
Source: https://academic.oup.com/jn/article/151/8/2153/6274469#284065208

Tyrosine 

Tyrosine is the amino acid used to make dopamine and noradrenaline, directly supporting neurotransmitter production. Clinical studies show overall positive results with tyrosine, including improved memory, cognitive flexibility, mental health, physical and mental stamina, and reaction times. Alone, it is more effective in healthy people wanting to boost cognitive function [6].

Phosphatidylserine

Phosphatidylserine can help maintain cellular health and prevent a loss in brain volume as you age. Brain cells are extremely long for their overall size, and phosphatidylserine is able to help shuttle growth factors up and down their axons, which supports cell maintenance [9]

L-Theanine

As described above, L-theanine improves both mental health and cognitive performance. Research involving people with major depressive disorder even shows positive effects on anxiety, sleep, test score accuracy, verbal memory, and overall executive function [10]. Many people take L-theanine for weight loss and memory thanks to its long-term benefits. 

brain pill review How L-theanine can help with depression and anxiety

It was found that L-theanine improved both depression and anxiety
Source: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6836118/

Docosahexaenoic Acid (DHA) Complex 

As a fatty acid, DHA both directly supports the brain’s mass through integration into fatty tissue and calms inflammation. The anti-inflammatory effect assists antioxidants in preventing the formation of harmful free radicals and restores much-missed mental clarity in older adults [11]

Vitamin B12 

Vitamin B12 optimizes brain performance in two ways: assisting in the production of new red blood cells, which carry oxygen, and in neurotransmitter production. Its major role in the brain is in the methionine cycle, providing enough methionine to act as a cofactor in neurotransmitter formation [12]

Vitamin B9 (Folic Acid)

Folic acid is another key vitamin in red blood cell development and the methionine cycle. A deficiency may impair neurotransmitter production and lead to a rise in homocysteine, which may increase the risk of cognitive dysfunction and dementia. Its additional roles in serotonin synthesis can support a positive mental attitude [12]

Vitamin B6 

Vitamin B6 is required for serotonin and dopamine production from their amino acid bases, alongside the calming neurotransmitter GABA and the stimulating glutamate. Without it, the enzymes that synthesize these brain chemicals cannot function [12]

Vitamin B5 (Pantothenic Acid)

Vitamin B5, also known as pantothenic acid, can improve mental performance by increasing cellular energy and neurotransmitter generation. Its main role in the brain is aiding acetylcholine neurotransmitter production [12]

Bacopa Monnieri

Bacopa monnieri is a popular nootropic herbal remedy. The major Bacopa benefits involve dopamine, serotonin, and acetylcholine support, and antioxidant properties that protect the brain from harmful free radicals. In the long-term, it preserves cognitive ability through inhibiting amyloid plaque buildup. 

Bacopa may even prevent heart disorders by lowering blood pressure too, through opening the blood vessels [4]

brain pill review How Bacopa Monnieri can improve reaction time of power of attention

It was also found that Bacopa Monnieri can improve reaction time over the course of 12 weeks
Source: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3537209/

Ginkgo Biloba

Many people take ginkgo biloba for memory, as it can relieve brain fog and restore mental alertness by increasing circulation. A range of patients, from healthy volunteers out to improve mental alertness to those with mild or even moderate dementia, show beneficial effects on cognitive functions. It is most effective after at least five months of supplementation [13]

Huperzine A 

As described above, Huperzine A boosts your brain power by supporting acetylcholine levels. As a key neurotransmitter for cognitive functions, acetylcholine aids communication between brain cells and may increase your exam scores or performance at work [3]

Vinpocetine 

Vinpocetine is less commonly found in brain supplements but is a potent nootropic. Through enhancing cellular energy generation, protecting cells from damage, and improving circulation to the brain, vinpocetine may even be protective in neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s disease [5]

Where Can I Buy Brain Pill?

Brain Pill is available directly from the company website, as well as Amazon and eBay.

Brain Pill Price and Guarantee

You can purchase Brain Pill in packages ranging from one to six months. If you’d like to try it but are skeptical, the one-month option is $69.95. The six-month package is the most cost-effective deal, at $354.95—just over $59 per bottle. Free global shipping is included in this deal, too. 

Brain Pill promises a 60-day money-back guarantee if you purchase the supplement directly from their website. If the results aren’t what you were looking for, simply contact the company for a full product refund. This does not include shipping and handling charges. 

Brain Pill Customer Reviews

The majority of Brain pill customer reviews are positive, with users saying they felt more motivated and focused. There are a handful of negative reviews, with customers commenting that they felt no change after taking the supplement.

review1

review2

review3

Brain Pill Alternatives

There are many other nootropic supplements available if Brain Pill doesn’t feel right for you, including Mind Lab Pro and Performance Lab Mind. 

To research other options that may help boost brain performance, start by checking out this Noocube review here, or this Hunter Focus review

Mind Lab Pro

brain pill review

Mind Lab Pro aims to boost brain power from as many angles as possible. Neurotransmitter production, brain cell regeneration, antioxidant support, brain wave regulation, and a circulation boost are all represented by its 11 ingredients. 

Mind Lab Pro contains most of the ingredients seen in Brain Pill, but with a few differences, including rhodiola instead of vinpocetine. Rhodiola benefits include a reduction in stress hormones, so Mind Lab Pro may help reduce anxiety levels [14]. There are no potentially harmful fillers, improving cognitive functioning without concerns over long-term safety. 

To learn more, read the full Mind Lab Pro review here. 

Performance Lab Mind Nootropics

brain pill review

Performance Lab Mind is a streamlined nootropic containing tyrosine, citicoline, phosphatidylserine, and maritime pine bark extract. Together, they improve focus, cognitive speed, brain cell regeneration, and antioxidant status. Performance Lab Mind also does not include potentially toxic fillers such as titanium dioxide. 

If you’re interested in learning more, check out the complete Performance Lab Mind review here. 

FAQ

What are the most important things we need to know before taking Brain Pill?

Do Brain Pills Really Work? 

Many people give Brain Pill positive reviews, describing benefits such as improved mental alertness and concentration. However, everyone is different, so you may need another nootropic supplement entirely. 

What Is the Best Brain Pill To Take? 

There is only one Brain Pill product, containing all 13 ingredients described here. However, there are a number of other nootropics for motivation, memory, and overall cognition on the market. Some of the best include Mind Lab Pro and Performance Lab Mind.

Is Brain Pill Safe?

The active ingredients of Brain Pill are safe for most people, although you may have to use caution if you are taking other drugs or supplements that raise neurotransmitter levels. 

It is unclear whether titanium dioxide is a safe filler ingredient, however. Research on animals suggests that it may promote gastrointestinal inflammation and take a long time to be cleared from the body’s tissues. There is also the possibility that it raises the risk of cancers (as suggested in animal models), so it is classified as a Group 2B carcinogen [15].

What Is the New Brain Pill?

Brain Pill is one of the lesser-known nootropic supplements, so it may seem new to you. Made with vitamins, anti-inflammatory fatty acids, stimulating herbal extracts, and “brain food” nutrients, it can improve focus, mental clarity, and reduce anxiety levels. 

What Pill Is Good for the Brain and Memory?

Supplements that improve cognitive functions such as memory should contain ingredients that support neurotransmitter and energy production. For long-term benefits, support for cellular protection and brain cell regeneration are recommended in a cognitive enhancer.

What Happens if I Take Too Much Brain Pill?

Any side effects you may experience depends on how far you’ve gone over the recommended dose, any other medications you take, other health conditions, or your body weight. You may feel a little hyperactive from the stimulant effects of high serotonin and dopamine, for example. Excessive bleeding is a riskier consequence for ginkgo-containing supplements if you have a clotting disorder or take anticoagulants. 

Can I Buy Brain Pill at CVS or Walmart?

Brain Pill does not appear to be available from Walmart or CVS. You must go to the product website, Amazon, or eBay. 

Does Brain Pill Work?

Considering all of its ingredients, Brain Pills should work for you in the context of an overall healthy diet and lifestyle. For best results, combine supplements with mental exercises, such as playing memory games, staying physically active, and keeping a healthy diet. 

Conclusion

With key vitamins for neurotransmitter production and other supportive nutrients for brain health alongside nootropic herbal extracts, Brain Pill may help improve your cognitive function or support you in regaining lost abilities. 

However, dosage amounts and the study testing the supplement is only described with no link to the original source. The addition of titanium dioxide as a filler is another concern. 

Overall, Brain Pill gets a thumbs up, but caution is advised if you have an inflammatory gastrointestinal disorder. 

References

  1. McGlade, Erin et al. “The Effect of Citicoline Supplementation on Motor Speed and Attention in Adolescent Males.” Journal of attention disorders vol. 23,2 (2019): 121-134. doi:10.1177/1087054715593633 
  2. Türközü, Duygu, and Nevin Şanlier. “L-theanine, unique amino acid of tea, and its metabolism, health effects, and safety.” Critical reviews in food science and nutrition vol. 57,8 (2017): 1681-1687. doi:10.1080/10408398.2015.1016141 
  3. Sun, Q Q et al. “Huperzine-A capsules enhance memory and learning performance in 34 pairs of matched adolescent students.” Zhongguo yao li xue bao = Acta pharmacologica Sinica vol. 20,7 (1999): 601-3. 
  4. Aguiar, Sebastian, and Thomas Borowski. “Neuropharmacological review of the nootropic herb Bacopa monnieri.” Rejuvenation research vol. 16,4 (2013): 313-26. doi:10.1089/rej.2013.1431 
  5. Zhang, Yi-Shuai et al. “An update on vinpocetine: New discoveries and clinical implications.” European journal of pharmacology vol. 819 (2018): 30-34. doi:10.1016/j.ejphar.2017.11.041 
  6. Jongkees, Bryant J et al. “Effect of tyrosine supplementation on clinical and healthy populations under stress or cognitive demands--A review.” Journal of psychiatric research vol. 70 (2015): 50-7. doi:10.1016/j.jpsychires.2015.08.014 
  7. Posadzki, Paul et al. “Herb-drug interactions: an overview of systematic reviews.” British journal of clinical pharmacology vol. 75,3 (2013): 603-18. doi:10.1111/j.1365-2125.2012.04350.x 
  8. Parisi, Vincenzo et al. “Citicoline and Retinal Ganglion Cells: Effects on Morphology and Function.” Current neuropharmacology vol. 16,7 (2018): 919-932. doi:10.2174/1570159X15666170703111729 
  9. Naftelberg, Shiran et al. “Phosphatidylserine improves axonal transport by inhibition of HDAC and has potential in treatment of neurodegenerative diseases.” Neural regeneration research vol. 12,4 (2017): 534-537. doi:10.4103/1673-5374.205082 
  10. Hidese, Shinsuke et al. “Effects of chronic l-theanine administration in patients with major depressive disorder: an open-label study.” Acta neuropsychiatrica vol. 29,2 (2017): 72-79. doi:10.1017/neu.2016.33 
  11. Kidd, Parris M. “Omega-3 DHA and EPA for cognition, behavior, and mood: clinical findings and structural-functional synergies with cell membrane phospholipids.” Alternative medicine review : a journal of clinical therapeutic vol. 12,3 (2007): 207-27. 
  12. Tardy, Anne-Laure et al. “Vitamins and Minerals for Energy, Fatigue and Cognition: A Narrative Review of the Biochemical and Clinical Evidence.” Nutrients vol. 12,1 228. 16 Jan. 2020, doi:10.3390/nu12010228 
  13. Yuan, Qiuju et al. “Effects of Ginkgo biloba on dementia: An overview of systematic reviews.” Journal of ethnopharmacology vol. 195 (2017): 1-9. doi:10.1016/j.jep.2016.12.005 
  14. Panossian, A et al. “Rosenroot (Rhodiola rosea): traditional use, chemical composition, pharmacology and clinical efficacy.” Phytomedicine : international journal of phytotherapy and phytopharmacology vol. 17,7 (2010): 481-93. doi:10.1016/j.phymed.2010.02.002 
  15. Winkler, Hans Christian et al. “Critical review of the safety assessment of titanium dioxide additives in food.” Journal of nanobiotechnology vol. 16,1 51. 1 Jun. 2018, doi:10.1186/s12951-018-0376-8 
Category
Tags

No responses yet

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *